Vitamin C

fotolia_113936916

Vitamin C is important in the immune system and in the manufacture and metabolism of hormones. One of the key gifts of vitamin c is its role in the function and manufacture of collagen, as well as maintaining the integrity of the connective tissue which makes it important for two diabetic reasons: wound repair and maintaining healthy gums. As a powerful antioxidant, vitamin C helps lessen oxidative stress to the body and is thought to lower infection risk. Supplemental vitamin C may also lessen the duration and symptoms of a common cold, help delay or prevent cataracts, and support healthy immune function. Vitamin C is sensitive to heat. To retain the most Vitamin C, keep the temperature below 118 degrees. If you want the sensation of more warmth, add a little spice, warming herbs and/or ginger.

According to www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19263912:

 

“The immune system is strongly influenced by the intake of nutrients. For a long time there has been a controversy whether vitamin C can contribute to the prevention and therapy of the common cold. Several cells of the immune system can indeed accumulate vitamin C and need the vitamin to perform their task, especially phagocytes and t-cells. Thus a vitamin C deficiency results in a reduced resistance against certain pathogens whilst a higher supply enhances several immune system parameters. With regard to the common cold different studies including meta-analyses underline that the prophylactic intake of vitamin C may slightly reduce the duration of the illness in healthy persons but does not affect its incidence and severity. Supplementation of vitamin C is most effective in cases of physical strain or insufficient intake of the vitamin. With regard to the therapy of the common cold the application of vitamin C alone is without clinical effects.”

 Dr. Cousens recommends 1,000 mg of food-sourced vitamin C 3 times a day because of the overall effects. Foods high in vitamin c include goji berries, grapefruit, lemons, broccoli, red peppers, Brussel sprouts, and camu camu berries.
Here is a list of the top 10 foods highest in Vitamin C:
  1. Yellow, Red, and Green Bell Peppers#1: Peppers (Yellow Bell Peppers)

Vitamin C in 100g              Per 10 strips (52g)              Per large pepper (186g)

183.5mg (306% DV)         95.4mg (159% DV)            341.3mg (569% DV)

Other Peppers High in Vitamin C (%DV per large pepper): Sweet Red Peppers (349%), and Sweet Green Peppers (220%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Cross section of a strawberry guava#2: Guavas

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup (165g)    Per fruit (55g)

228.3mg (381% DV)         376.7mg (628% DV)         125.6mg (209% DV)

Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Close view of a Kale Leaf#3: Dark Green Leafy Vegetables (Kale)

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup chopped (67g)

120mg (200% DV)              80.4mg (134% DV)

Other Dark Green Leafy Vegetables High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup, chopped): Turnip Greens (55%), Swiss Chard (18%), and Spinach (14%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Cut and Peeled Kiwi Fruit#4: Kiwifruit (Green)

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup, sliced (180g)      Per fruit (69g)

92.7mg (155% DV)            166.9mg (278% DV)         64mg (107% DV)

Gold Kiwifruit are also High in Vitamin C (%DV per fruit): (151%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Close view of Broccoli#5: Broccoli

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup chopped (92g)

89.2mg (149% DV)            81.2mg (135% DV)

Other Brassica Vegetables High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup): Brussels Sprouts (125%), Green Cauliflower (94%), Cauliflower (86%), Red Cabbage (85%), and Cabbage (60%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Red Strawberries#6: Berries (Strawberries)

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup sliced (166g)        1 large strawberry (18g)

58.8mg (98% DV)               97.6mg (163% DV)            10.6mg (18% DV)

Other Berries High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup): Raspberries (54%), Blackberries (50%) and Blueberries (24%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Cross section and segment of an citrus #7: Citrus Fruits (Oranges)

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup, sections (180g) Per orange (131g)

53.2mg (89% DV)               95.8mg (160% DV)            69.7mg (116% DV)

Other Citrus Fruit High in Vitamin C (%DV per fruit): Pummelo (619%), Grapefruit (114%), Lemon (74%), Clementine (60%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Several ripe red tomatoes#8: Tomatoes (Cooked)

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup (240g)    Per 2 tomatoes (246g)

22.8mg (38% DV)               54.7mg (91% DV)               56.1mg (93% DV)

2 medium tomatoes contain just 44 calories and 0.3 grams of fat. Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Podded snow peas#9: Peas (Mange Tout)

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup (63g)       Per 10 pods (34g)

60mg (100% DV)                 37.8mg (63% DV)               20.4mg (34% DV)

Other Peas High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup): Green Peas (97%), and Frozen Peas cooked (59%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

  1. Cut Papaya#10: Papaya

Vitamin C in 100g              Per cup pieces (145g)       1 small papaya (157g)

60.9mg (102% DV)            88.3mg (147% DV)            95.6mg (159% DV)

Other Fruits High in Vitamin C (%DV per cup, chunks or balls): Mango (100%), Pineapple (131%), Cantaloupe Melon (108%), and Honeydew Melon (53%). Click to see complete nutrition facts.

usaSpain